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20131202
20131210
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KQED (PBS) 13
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
Bloomberg
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm EST
.. >>.. from our studios in new >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." >> people buy stocks, on that basis alone, they are buying a stock. that is called bottom fishing in the stock market. it is very difficult. >> peter lynch is here. he is a best-selling author and a philanthropist. for 13 years he ran the magellan fund with average returns of almost 30%. from 1977-1990, it grew from 18 million dollars in assets to $14 billion in assets. he retired at the age of 46 and has dedicated his time and resources to give away a large portion of his fortune. i am pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. we have this wonderful interview. i would occasionally say what ever happened to peter lynch? it was one of those things. and whatever happened? that is my question. >> people will say he will start his own fund. >> he wants to do it all on his own. he does not need the great fidelity. >> i have one gear, overdrive. i have a lovely wife, three children. i worked part-time with younger analysts. my father died at 46. he took sick when he was 43. i love
PBS
Dec 5, 2013 12:00am PST
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: why do people buy stock because of two-thirds of x or half of x. on that base alone they buy a stock. that's called bottom fishing in the stock market. >> rose: peter lynch is here. he is a legendary investor, a best-selling author, a philanthropist. for 13 years he ran fidelity's magellan fund with average annual returns of nearly 30%. from 1977 to 1990 it grew from $18 million in assets to $14 billion in assets. he retired at the age of 46. since then, he's dedicated his time and resources to giving away a large portion of his personal fortune. i'm pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: see i've been wanting -- we had this wonderful interview and i would occasionally say whatever happened to peter sflifrj >> (laughs) >> rose: it's one of those things because -- and whatever happened to peter lynch is my question. >> people said he'll start his own fund, the a hedge fund. >> rose: he wants to do it on his own, he doesn't need the gratify dellty. >> small tra
PBS
Dec 7, 2013 12:00am PST
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. et it fall, let there be work,b, god bless south africa, thank you. >> rose: the former president of south africa died today, he was 95, he was affectionately known by those closest to him was a man for all seasons, his life gave meaning to millions, he spent 27 years in prison for his fight for racial equality in south africa, after his release in 1990 he was awarded the nobel peace prize and served as president of south africa for five years. the power of mandela cannot be captured in the snapshot of his achievements, there was also the man himself, he was a quiet man in many ways, but with great power to influence, a father of six who is also the father of a nation, a country, and a philosophy. mandela was born in 1918 in a small village in the eastern cape of south africa, his work campaigning against a ruling national party's apartheid policies grew in the coming years. in 1963, he was brought to stand trial for plotting to over throw the government by violence. he famously said at his trial, i have cherished the ideal of
PBS
Dec 10, 2013 12:00pm PST
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> the m.p.c. intends at a minimum to maintain the currently exceptionally accommodative stance of monetary policy until economic slack has been substantially reduced, provided by that this does not put at risk either price stability or financial stability. >> rose: mark carney is here. he has been governor of the bank of england since july of this year. he was previously governor of the bank of canada. he's the first non-brit to take on the role. he succeeded sir mervin king. the economy has avoided a triple dip recession and is showing signs of recovery. he gave a speech at the economic club of new york in which he said he anticipated the economy to fulfill the hopes and dreams of the holiday season. in the u.s., the latest unemployment numbers have led to some speculation of a tapering by the federal reserve's bond-buying program. i am pleased to have mark carney at this table for the first time. welcome. >> thank you very much. >> rose: pleasure to have you here. >> pleasure to be here. >> rose: let me start with cana
Bloomberg
Dec 6, 2013 8:00pm EST
building in new york city lit up in the colors of the south african flag in tribute to the late nelson mandela. i am mark crumpton. that is it for bottom line. have a great weekend. i will see you next time. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." >> we begin our coverage of the death of nelson mandela with a -- the cbs evening news. >> he was born july 18, 1918. him a namegave meaning "troublemaker," but later a school teacher in nelson. at 23.d to johannesburg he became one of the nation's first black lawyers and joined the opposition african national congress in the early 1940's, devoting himself to peacefully ending apartheid. 1960, peaceful black demonstrators were killed by white south african police in in infamous massacre. men alike came to believe the only reef force -- mandela came to believe then that the only recourse was violence. >> it is futile for us to continue talking peace and a governmentgainst whose reply is only savage attacks on an unarmed and defenseless people. >> he was arrested and sentenced to life for sabotage and conspiracy
PBS
Dec 4, 2013 12:00am PST
studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> almost one in every four children in the united states of america lives in a state of poverty. that's an outrage. one way to think about it: of the top 35 industrial countries in the world, we have the second highest poverty rate. >> rose: stan drugen miller is here. for 30 years he maintained one of the best investment track records on wall street. he orchestrated a campaign at colleges across the country to educate and mobilize action on entitlement reform and other government spending. he says without a major overhaul soon today's young people will be robbed of the future benefits and standard of living they deserve. i am pleased to have stan druckenmiller at this table. welcome. >> good to see you. >> rose: can i just start with understanding you, you know, this remarkable record with duquesne and with quantum fund and george soros and the relationship you've had. you -- where are you in your life? >> rose: you mean what am i doing? >> yeah. >> i'm still moneying very actively. >> rose: for family or for -- >> for family and th
PBS
Dec 3, 2013 12:00am PST
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: mandy patinkin is here. he is an emmy and tony award-winning actor. he is one extraordinary singer. he stars in the showtime series homeland as you know. as you also know his character sal, a cia director and the show some say moral center. here is a look at his performance. >>> saul. saul! >> rose: his iconic role as a spanish wordsman in rob reiner's film the princess bride has gained cult status. >> my name is monday toy avment you killed my father. prepare to die. >> he also a broadway veteran of more than 30 years and interpreter of stephen sondheim. i'm enormously pleased to have mandy patinkin back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: you're just back from australia. >> yes. >> rose: doing what? >> i was doing a series of concerts there with my dear friend nathan gunn, the wonderful, glorious-- glorious opera singer who just started rehearsals today at the met for magic flute. and we did three concerts in australia, sydney, business done-- brisbon, melbourne and automaticland and d
Bloomberg
Dec 7, 2013 10:00pm EST
>> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." >> we begin our coverage of the death of nelson mandela with the cbs evening news. >> he was born july 18, 1918. his mother gave him a name meaning "troublemaker," but later a school teacher in nelson. he moved to johannesburg at 23. he became one of the nation's first black lawyers and joined the opposition african national congress in the early 1940's, devoting himself to peacefully ending apartheid. then in 1960, peaceful black demonstrators were killed by white south african police in the infamous massacre. mandela came to believe then that the only recourse was violence. >> it is futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government whose reply is only savage attacks on an unarmed and defenseless people. >> he was arrested and sentenced to life for sabotage and conspiracy. he served most of his life on robben island, the alcatraz of south africa. a fellow prisoner said mandela never let his spirit die. >> he accepted that he may not live to see the victory. but he did not doubt that the freedom
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 12:00pm PST
him in peace. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. captioning sponsored by >> we begin our coverage with the death of nelson mandela wih the news by scott pelley. >> his mother named him holy sasha meaning troublemaker but later a teacher renamed his nelson. he moved to johanns percent. he joined the national congress in the early 1940's devoting himself then to peacefully ending apartheid. then in 960, 69 peaceful protester were killed by the police in the infamous massacre. mandela came to believe that the only recourse then was violence. >> it is useless for us to continue talking peace and non-violence against a government -- on defenseless people. >> he was arrested in 1962 and later sentenced to life for sabotage and conspiracy. he served most of his time on robin island, the alcatraz of south africa. his fellow prisoner said mandela never let his spirit die. >> he worked on the premise that he would live to see the victory. he accepted that he may not live to see the victory. but he did not doubt that the strug
PBS
Dec 2, 2013 12:00pm PST
new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: ron howard is here. he is an oscar-winning filmmaker. his new movie "rush" re@s a 1970 formula one rivalry between james hunt and his austrian opponent niki lauda. critics are calling it one of ron howard's personal best. here is the trailer for the film. >> you've changed, haven't you? >> yeah. >> who's that? >> it's nicki laud dashgs he's just been signed by ferrari. >> really? >> he's driving like an old man. >> what's the incentive? why would i go fast? >> because i'm asking you to. >> this is an incredible battle between these two great drivers! >> i know, i'm terrible. >> no, you're not terrible, it's just who you are at this point in your life. >> to be a champion it takes more than being quick. you have to really believe it. >> i've been ready for this my whole life. >> i can beat this guy, trust me. >> he's consistent, dependable. >> can he put his life on the line the day it matters? >> this is the racing grudge match of the decade. >> world champion niki lauda trapped in a searing inferno of 800 plus degrees. >> talk to me, >
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)